Who is jane fonda dating now

"Isn’t that the thinnest billionaire’s wallet you ever saw?

" Ted Turner gloats on a drizzling day in New York.

"I quit completely a year ago, but prior to that, all I’ve drunk is a glass or two of wine,” he says.

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I didn’t like the way it made me feel." He gave up without joining Alcoholics Anonymous: "I never needed to." Turner sees a psychiatrist friend once a month, though he qualifies, "I’m not in therapy; it’s just somebody to talk to." He took lithium for a few years but now blames it on a psychiatrist who wrongly diagnosed him as manic depressive. N., so he can afford it,” Turner quips.) He retains, according to Forbes, a $2 billion net worth.

What he has, he says, is “a mild to moderate case of anxiety. The word doesn’t exist for me.” He may lack the ebullience of his earlier years, yet Turner shuttles endlessly among his 28 properties — 14 of them ranches with 55,000 bison — traveling hundreds of thousands of miles per year on his private Challenger jet, making numerous speeches when he’s not communing with nature in the "wilderness," as he puts it. His energy may be flagging, but some drive keeps propelling him forward, in an unending race to achieve more — or outrun his inner demons.

With nearly 2 million acres, he was America’s largest landowner until his friend, Liberty Media chairman John Malone, surpassed him. The 2001 departure of Jane Fonda from his life, after a 10-year marriage, may have fueled this.

He admits it shook him profoundly and perhaps contributed to the sense one has of his being emotionally adrift, no matter how vast his accomplishments.

The tycoon-turned-philanthropist has removed the wallet from his blazer to show me a printed card with his "11 Voluntary Initiatives," an oddly naive reinvention of the Ten Commandments that he concocted some 15 years ago, including such vows as "I promise to care for Planet Earth and all living things thereon, especially my fellow beings." PHOTOS: Ted Turner's Life and Loves in Photos He leans forward, adamant about reading each one. "I worked on them for a long time." It’s a rare burst of energy from this man who once epitomized it.

At age 73, there’s almost no trace of the frenetic, hyper-kinetic mogul once known as the “Mouth of the South” and “Captain Outrageous." His antics (from keeping a pet alligator as a student to almost losing his life in a 1968 sailing race) and innovative empire-building (turning a tiny TV station into a nation-spanning “superstation" and launching the first global TV news network, CNN) have made him the stuff of legend, putting his present absence from the media scene in stark relief.This onetime social gadfly, who hobnobbed with President Carter and Soviet chief Mikhail Gorbachev (whom he still cites as his hero), has a relatively quiet social life."I have several good friends but not one [in particular],” he says.But unlike them, he has moved on, giving up the executive life to "save the world,” as he puts it, an endeavor that began with his unprecedented

At age 73, there’s almost no trace of the frenetic, hyper-kinetic mogul once known as the “Mouth of the South” and “Captain Outrageous." His antics (from keeping a pet alligator as a student to almost losing his life in a 1968 sailing race) and innovative empire-building (turning a tiny TV station into a nation-spanning “superstation" and launching the first global TV news network, CNN) have made him the stuff of legend, putting his present absence from the media scene in stark relief.This onetime social gadfly, who hobnobbed with President Carter and Soviet chief Mikhail Gorbachev (whom he still cites as his hero), has a relatively quiet social life."I have several good friends but not one [in particular],” he says.But unlike them, he has moved on, giving up the executive life to "save the world,” as he puts it, an endeavor that began with his unprecedented $1 billion gift in support of the United Nations in 1997.This, along with other philanthropies he’s launched, has been his mandate for much of the past decade — more than a mandate, a mission.Often, during our conversations, he tunnels down a track of his own — spending 15 minutes on his Voluntary Initiatives, for instance — as if his mind is full of his own thoughts and private obsessions. Charming and refined, she assures me in the few seconds we get to speak that Turner is affectionate and fully loving, whatever Fonda’s statements may have implied to the contrary. But though he has several girlfriends, it is a very small number, and he does not take them up lightly, and he gives them his absolute support when he does.

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At age 73, there’s almost no trace of the frenetic, hyper-kinetic mogul once known as the “Mouth of the South” and “Captain Outrageous." His antics (from keeping a pet alligator as a student to almost losing his life in a 1968 sailing race) and innovative empire-building (turning a tiny TV station into a nation-spanning “superstation" and launching the first global TV news network, CNN) have made him the stuff of legend, putting his present absence from the media scene in stark relief.

This onetime social gadfly, who hobnobbed with President Carter and Soviet chief Mikhail Gorbachev (whom he still cites as his hero), has a relatively quiet social life.

"I have several good friends but not one [in particular],” he says.

But unlike them, he has moved on, giving up the executive life to "save the world,” as he puts it, an endeavor that began with his unprecedented $1 billion gift in support of the United Nations in 1997.

This, along with other philanthropies he’s launched, has been his mandate for much of the past decade — more than a mandate, a mission.

Often, during our conversations, he tunnels down a track of his own — spending 15 minutes on his Voluntary Initiatives, for instance — as if his mind is full of his own thoughts and private obsessions. Charming and refined, she assures me in the few seconds we get to speak that Turner is affectionate and fully loving, whatever Fonda’s statements may have implied to the contrary. But though he has several girlfriends, it is a very small number, and he does not take them up lightly, and he gives them his absolute support when he does.

||

At age 73, there’s almost no trace of the frenetic, hyper-kinetic mogul once known as the “Mouth of the South” and “Captain Outrageous." His antics (from keeping a pet alligator as a student to almost losing his life in a 1968 sailing race) and innovative empire-building (turning a tiny TV station into a nation-spanning “superstation" and launching the first global TV news network, CNN) have made him the stuff of legend, putting his present absence from the media scene in stark relief.

This onetime social gadfly, who hobnobbed with President Carter and Soviet chief Mikhail Gorbachev (whom he still cites as his hero), has a relatively quiet social life.

"I have several good friends but not one [in particular],” he says.

But unlike them, he has moved on, giving up the executive life to "save the world,” as he puts it, an endeavor that began with his unprecedented $1 billion gift in support of the United Nations in 1997.

billion gift in support of the United Nations in 1997.This, along with other philanthropies he’s launched, has been his mandate for much of the past decade — more than a mandate, a mission.Often, during our conversations, he tunnels down a track of his own — spending 15 minutes on his Voluntary Initiatives, for instance — as if his mind is full of his own thoughts and private obsessions. Charming and refined, she assures me in the few seconds we get to speak that Turner is affectionate and fully loving, whatever Fonda’s statements may have implied to the contrary. But though he has several girlfriends, it is a very small number, and he does not take them up lightly, and he gives them his absolute support when he does.

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